Rebuilding the Lives of Arkansas Children and Families Since 1899

FREE Overnight Grief Camp Set for June 1-2, 2018

May 24, 2018

Camp Healing Hearts Helps Grieving Arkansas Children, Families Reflect, Reconnect and Rediscover To Register Your Family, visit:  https://form.jotform.com/scox/CAMP_HEALING_HEARTS To Volunteer, visit:  https://form.jotform.com/60965029087160 Losing a loved one is difficult for everyone, and grieving that loss is essential to accepting painful feelings and creating an opportunity for growth and a new sense of normal. Camp Healing Hearts is for Arkansas children ages 5 to 18 and their families who have lost a loved one and are coping with grief and bereavement. Utilizing both therapy and recreation, Camp Healing Hearts offers children and families an opportunity to discover their own inner strength.   Camp Healing Hearts is a yearly event coordinated by Kaleidoscope Grief Center, which is a program of Methodist Family Health. It is a FREE overnight camp at Camp Aldersgate in Little Rock and includes heart-to-heart time, swimming, fishing, crafts, games, campfires and s’mores, a challenge course and much more. Only 100 spaces are available so those interested in attending are encouraged to complete and return an application prior to the deadline, which is May 25, 2018. Camp Healing Hearts utilizes both therapy and recreation and offers children and families an opportunity to discover their own inner strength. An adult caregiver is required to accompany the grieving child or children attending camp. Camp Healing Hearts is made possible by community partners in the Alliance for Grief and Loss, including Arkansas Children’s Hospital, Little Rock School District, Pulaski County Special School District, Griffin-Leggett Funeral Homes, Delta Society and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.   For an application, visit MethodistFamily.org/Camp-Healing-Hearts-2018. For more information about Camp Healing Hearts or Kaleidoscope Grief Center, contact Dao Ward at dward@methodistfamily.org or call 501-537-3991 or 800-756-3709 toll-free.   ABOUT KALEIDOSCOPE GRIEF CENTER Kaleidoscope Grief Center serves grieving children, teens and their families throughout Arkansas. Grief can be an isolating experience for children. We help those dealing with loss and bereavement through education, therapeutic and recreational services, grief support programs, counseling and Camp Healing Hearts.   ABOUT METHODIST FAMILY HEALTH Founded in 1899 as the Arkansas Methodist Orphanage, Methodist Family Health has expanded into a continuum of care to serve thousands of Arkansas children with psychiatric, behavioral, emotional and spiritual issues and their families each year. Methodist Family Health has locations throughout the state, including the Methodist Behavioral Hospital, two residential treatment centers, eight therapeutic group homes, an emergency shelter, a day treatment program, eight counseling clinics, nine school-based counseling clinics, the state’s only grief center for children and their families, and the Arkansas Center for Addictions Research, Education and Services (Arkansas CARES). Our mission is to give the best possible care to those who may need our help and to treat the whole person: behaviorally, emotionally and spiritually.

Continue Reading →

Three Simple Rules – First, Do No Harm!

May 24, 2018

If you had to condense all of the Bible’s directives in to 3 rules, what would you say those rules would be? This is the question that I asked our kids at the Little Rock RTC on Monday night, and the answers were varied. They included not being greedy, avoiding racism, loving God, following the 10 commandments (which I kind of felt like was a “wishing for more wishes” answer,) and loving yourself. This was a hard task for the kids, but I also feel like it would also be a difficult task for us. When given this assignment, one of the kids called out, “We don’t have the whole Bible memorized!” Which, is so true, right? We don’t have the whole Bible memorized, and sadly, most of us probably never will. Thank God that we have the access to it that we do! John Wesley, the founder of the Methodist movement, summarized God’s directives to His people in what he called “Three Simple Rules.” Wesley said that if we could “Do No Harm, Do Good, and Attend to the Ordinances of God (or, more simply, Stay in Love with God)” that we would be following God’s plan for our lives. While these are much easier stated than actually followed, I do think that these three instructions can give us a great starting point for more closely walking the path that God has for us. “Do No Harm” is the first rule, and the one which I would like to look at today. To do no harm basically means that we refrain from causing destruction where we go. While it sounds kind of ridiculous to think that we are walking around producing harm, I think that we sometime unintentionally end up doing just that. Our decisions may cause harm to God’s creation, our actions may cause harm to our relationships, and our lack of self-care may cause harm to our bodies. However, I think for many of us (myself included) the way in which we most often cause harm is through our words. Have you ever been at a point where you desperately wish you could rewind the past 5 seconds, or somehow cause the words that just escaped your lips to jump back in your mouth? (Or maybe even that you could unsend a text/e-mail/posted comment?) Even as I sit here writing this today, I can become anxious and saddened thinking of harm that I have caused through my words. Maybe words aren’t your struggle, though. Everyone’s struggles look different; therefore, everyone’s harm will look a little different. The Bible is full of passages that remind us to not cause harm, but instead, to love. Not only are we supposed to love others, but Jesus goes so far as to command us to love those who are difficult to love. Those who hurt us, those who are evil, those who cause us grief. Unfortunately, we are even to avoid harm to those people. Romans 12:14-18 says, 14 Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse. 15 Rejoice with those who rejoice; mourn with those who mourn. 16 Live in harmony with one another. Do not be proud, but be willing to associate with people of low position.[a] Do not be conceited.17 Do not repay anyone evil for evil. Be careful to do what is right in the eyes of everyone. 18 If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone. These are some big, hard words, right? Live in peace with everyone? Regardless of what they have done to us? The only consolation that I see, the only way that this is even a remote possibility in my life, is that I don’t have to follow this directive on my own. It is only by Christ living in us that we are able to prevent harm to others, and it is only through relying on Him that we can live this out. The challenge that I gave the kids on Monday, and the one that I want to present for us today, is that we live a week where we do no harm. Where we live more aware of our words, our actions, and our impact, and where we invite the Holy Spirit to help us as we seek to live in such a way that we bring no harm to any aspect of His creation! Amy Shores is the director of pastoral care at Methodist Family Health.

Continue Reading →

Ride to the Rescue! 2018 Southern Silks Fundraiser

April 9, 2018

Purchase tickets HERE. Ride to the Rescue of Children and Families in Arkansas Celebrate the 144th running of the Kentucky Derby with a post-race soiree that will include faux horse races where guests are the jockeys! We’ll be awarding prizes for each race, plus guests will enjoy a Kentucky Derby-inspired dinner and libations, live and silent auctions, a hat contest, and much more. Southern Silks benefits Methodist Family Health, a 119-year-old organization that provides behavioral and mental health care to Arkansas children and families. To purchase tickets, please CLICK HERE. Tickets are $75 per person (assigned seating, open table) or $50 per person (general admission). Sponsorship opportunities start at $1,000 and include designated seating. Join us May 5, 2018, at 6 p.m. at the Metroplex Event Center in Little Rock for our Derby Day Soiree! For more information about the event, contact Cathey Henry at chenry@methodistfamily.org or 501.906.4209. To learn more about how Southern Silks works, see Southern Silks 2018 Rules of the Game. To volunteer at Southern Silks, click VOLUNTEER. Check back to get ready to bid on fabulous items in the Live Auction. Follow the fun on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram using our event hashtag #SouthernSilks18. 2018 Southern Silks Sponsors and Donors

Continue Reading →

Shining a Light on Seasonal Affective Disorder

January 11, 2018

January 2018 ushered in some of the coldest weather on record – 90 continuous hours of sub-zero temperatures. Couple that with short days and long nights, and anyone from children to adults can find themselves with seasonal affective disorder. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, is a type of depression that comes and goes with the seasons, typically starting in the late fall and early winter and going away during the spring and summer. Anyone can be affected by it as more children and teens are reporting experiencing SAD symptoms. SAD is not a separate form of depression; instead, it is a type of major depression that manifests during the seasons. The symptoms of major depression include: Feeling depressed most of the day, nearly every day Feeling hopeless or worthless Having low energy Losing interest in activities you once enjoyed Having problems with sleep Experiencing changes in your appetite or weight Feeling sluggish or agitated Having difficulty concentrating Having frequent thoughts of death or suicide. If you notice the following symptoms in winter, you may have the winter pattern of SAD: Low energy Hypersomnia (sleepy all the time, sleeping long hours or able to fall asleep anytime, even while driving) Overeating Weight gain Craving for carbohydrates Social withdrawal According to NIMH, there are certain risk factors for SAD that can increase your chances of having it. These include: Being female. SAD is diagnosed four timesmore often in women than men. Living far from the equator. SAD is more frequent in people who live far north or south of the equator. For example, one percent of those who live in Florida and nine percent of those who live in New England or Alaska suffer from SAD. Family history. People with a family history of other types of depression are more likely to develop SAD than people who do not have a family history of depression. Having depression or bipolar disorder. The symptoms of depression may worsen with the seasons if you have one of these conditions (but SAD is diagnosed only if seasonal depressions are the most common). Younger adults have a higher risk of SAD than older adults, and SAD has been reported even in children and teens. How can you treat SAD? After you talk with a healthcare professional about your symptoms and she or he diagnoses you with SAD, there are some ways to combat it. Those include: Medication, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which is a common depression medication that enhances the function of your brain’s nerve cells that regulate emotion. Light therapy, which replaces the amount of natural sunlight lacking in the autumn and winter months. According to NIMH, light therapy administers bright, artificial light to increase the amount of daily exposure a person with SAD receives. Symptoms of SAD may be relieved by sitting in front of a light box first thing in the morning each day during the early fall until spring. Most typically, light boxes filter out the ultraviolet rays and require 20-60 minutes of exposure to 10,000 lux of cool-white fluorescent light, an amount that is about 20 times greater than ordinary indoor lighting. Psychotherapy, which helps the person with SAD identify her or his sad thoughts and replace them with more positive ones. Vitamin D, which helps regulate the messages nerves receive from the brain and deliver to the body. Vitamin D also fortifies the immune system so the body can combat bacteria and viruses that can cause illness. If these freezing days and long nights are making you feel sadder than you remember feeling before, contact your doctor for a check-up. If you notice your child or teenager is having a trying time during the autumn or winter months, you can contact any Methodist Health Foundation Counseling Clinic at info@methodistfamily.org for an assessment and guidance.

Continue Reading →

Upcoming Events

 
June 1, 2018 - 5:00PM
Camp Healing Hearts
 
June 2, 2018 - 12:00AM
Camp Healing Heart
 
June 29, 2018 - 7:00PM
Methodist Family Health Night at the Travs
 
July 3, 2018 - 6:00PM
Kaleidoscope Grief Center – Individual Sessions
 
July 17, 2018 - 6:00PM
Kaleidoscope Grief Center – Individual Sessions